(via feellng)


chrisxscarlett:

this always makes me smile..they’re not afraid to be all mushy about it when they’re alone 


rhamphotheca:

Brain Evolution by Dwayne Godwin and Jorge Cham
(via: Scientific American magazine)

rhamphotheca:

Brain Evolution by Dwayne Godwin and Jorge Cham

(via: Scientific American magazine)

(via currentsinbiology)


currentsinbiology:

Mouse embryo (16 dpc) expressing the epithelial-specific nuclear marker K14-H2B-GFP, illustrating the pattern of whisker follicles on the face
Evan Heller
The Rockefeller University, Fuchs Lab
New York City, New York, USA
Technique: Fluorescence (4x)

currentsinbiology:

Mouse embryo (16 dpc) expressing the epithelial-specific nuclear marker K14-H2B-GFP, illustrating the pattern of whisker follicles on the face

Evan Heller

The Rockefeller University, Fuchs Lab

New York City, New York, USA

Technique: Fluorescence (4x)


currentsinbiology:

Moose Spit is Antifungal

Moose “kind of salivate a lot,” says York Univeristy biologist Dawn Bazely, ”They slobber around.” With the help of the Toronto Zoo, Bazely has been studying the properties of this abundant moose spit. So far, Bazely has found that moose spit (and European reindeer spit) has anti-fungal properties, says the CBC. 

Antifungal saliva is helpful for moose, says the CBC, because some of the plants they eat use fungi as a self-protection mechanism. Too much fungus in their food can make moose sick.

currentsinbiology:

Moose Spit is Antifungal

Moose “kind of salivate a lot,” says York Univeristy biologist Dawn Bazely, ”They slobber around.” With the help of the Toronto Zoo, Bazely has been studying the properties of this abundant moose spit. So far, Bazely has found that moose spit (and European reindeer spit) has anti-fungal propertiessays the CBC

Antifungal saliva is helpful for moose, says the CBC, because some of the plants they eat use fungi as a self-protection mechanism. Too much fungus in their food can make moose sick.




currentsinbiology:

Study Says ZMapp Works Against Ebola (NY Times)
A new study provides strong evidence that the experimental drug given to two American aid workers stricken with Ebola in Africa really works and could make a difference in the current outbreak — if more of it could be produced.
In the study, all 18 monkeys exposed to a lethal dose of Ebola virus survived when given the drug, known as ZMapp, even when the treatment was started five days after infection, when the animals were already sick.

currentsinbiology:

Study Says ZMapp Works Against Ebola (NY Times)

A new study provides strong evidence that the experimental drug given to two American aid workers stricken with Ebola in Africa really works and could make a difference in the current outbreak — if more of it could be produced.

In the study, all 18 monkeys exposed to a lethal dose of Ebola virus survived when given the drug, known as ZMapp, even when the treatment was started five days after infection, when the animals were already sick.


currentsinbiology:

not-safe-for-earth:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

carnivaldog:

homemadehorrors:

excessunrated:

SUCH A BABY.

…perfect bby.

OKAY I have to drop some newly acquired knowledge, and maybe a lot of people already know this BUT LISTEN
Hippos are, like…real, living land whales. It’s been genetically proven that their closest relatives are NOT pigs as was once believed, but whales! Hippos even make whistles and clicks underwater to communicate as well as help them “see” in murky waters. 
They also have some incredibly thick skin that is extremely difficult to cut, and when they do get injured their skin secretes a special fluid that acts like a natural antibiotic ointment that prevents infections and speeds up the healing process. And this fluid turns blood red when it meets the air, so it looks pretty badass, too.
Also, the bones in their limbs are SOLID. There is no marrow, no hollow space, they are 100% BONE, MOTHERFUCKER. It helps weigh them down in the water so they can more easily submerge, and it helps support their weight on land. These bones can withstand the impact of a running hippo, and they aren’t slow, either!
Hippos are also responsible for more human deaths annually than crocodiles or other predators like lions and so on. Because they don’t take no shit, bro. 
HIPPOS ARE REALLY FREAKING COOL, YOU GUYS.

*whispers* the number one cause of baby hippo deaths is adult male hippos

That’s because somewhere between that adorable squishy above and adulthood, they become one of the most aggressive animals on earth.

Fascinating!

currentsinbiology:

not-safe-for-earth:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

carnivaldog:

homemadehorrors:

excessunrated:

SUCH A BABY.

…perfect bby.

OKAY I have to drop some newly acquired knowledge, and maybe a lot of people already know this BUT LISTEN

Hippos are, like…real, living land whales. It’s been genetically proven that their closest relatives are NOT pigs as was once believed, but whales! Hippos even make whistles and clicks underwater to communicate as well as help them “see” in murky waters. 

They also have some incredibly thick skin that is extremely difficult to cut, and when they do get injured their skin secretes a special fluid that acts like a natural antibiotic ointment that prevents infections and speeds up the healing process. And this fluid turns blood red when it meets the air, so it looks pretty badass, too.

Also, the bones in their limbs are SOLID. There is no marrow, no hollow space, they are 100% BONE, MOTHERFUCKER. It helps weigh them down in the water so they can more easily submerge, and it helps support their weight on land. These bones can withstand the impact of a running hippo, and they aren’t slow, either!

Hippos are also responsible for more human deaths annually than crocodiles or other predators like lions and so on. Because they don’t take no shit, bro. 

HIPPOS ARE REALLY FREAKING COOL, YOU GUYS.

*whispers* the number one cause of baby hippo deaths is adult male hippos

That’s because somewhere between that adorable squishy above and adulthood, they become one of the most aggressive animals on earth.

Fascinating!


currentsinbiology:

skunkbear:

americasgreatoutdoors:

This bear is in Lake Clark National Park, a land of stunning beauty where volcanoes steam, salmon run, bears forage, craggy mountains reflect in shimmering turquoise lakes, and local people and culture still depend on the land and water of their home. Photo: Kevin Dietrich (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Don’t leave him hanging.

"Godless Killing Machine"???

currentsinbiology:

skunkbear:

americasgreatoutdoors:

This bear is in Lake Clark National Park, a land of stunning beauty where volcanoes steam, salmon run, bears forage, craggy mountains reflect in shimmering turquoise lakes, and local people and culture still depend on the land and water of their home.

Photo: Kevin Dietrich (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Don’t leave him hanging.

"Godless Killing Machine"???


underthevastblueseas:

The basking shark is the world’s second-largest fish. In summer, it swims open-mouthed at the surface, filtering out plankton. Every hour, the basking shark passes up to 395,000 gallons (1.5 million liters) of seawater through the huge gills that almost encircle its head. Its liver runs the length of the abdominal cavity and is filled with oil to aid buoyancy. They grow up to lengths of  20–36 ft (6–11 m).

via // video source

(via currentsinbiology)


currentsinbiology:


These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack
There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria.
A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D microscopy to identify a new mechanism for bacterial networking. They observed elaborate webs of a common soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, connected by thread-like membranes. This system of cellular pipelines suggests that some bacteria have evolved complex ways to deliver molecular cargo out of sight from snooping neighbors. Their work appears in the journal Environmental Microbiology.


Myxococcus xanthus biofilm devouring a colony of Escherichia coli. Credit: James Berlemanc

currentsinbiology:

These Bacteria Are Wired to Hunt Like a Tiny Wolf Pack

There is an elaborate stealth communication network in the Earth beneath your feet. This smart web acts like a superorganism, fortifying defensive capabilities and coordinating deadly attacks on unsuspecting targets. But it’s not run by the NSA, the CIA, or the military. This web is made of bacteria.

A team of scientists led by Manfred Auer at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have used cutting-edge 3-D microscopy to identify a new mechanism for bacterial networking. They observed elaborate webs of a common soil bacterium, Myxococcus xanthus, connected by thread-like membranes. This system of cellular pipelines suggests that some bacteria have evolved complex ways to deliver molecular cargo out of sight from snooping neighbors. Their work appears in the journal Environmental Microbiology.

Myxococcus xanthus biofilm devouring a colony of Escherichia coli. Credit: James Berlemanc